What is Shrove Tuesday?

Shrove Tuesday is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday which is the first day of Lent. It’s a day of penitence, to clean the soul, and a day of celebration as the last chance to feast before Lent begins. But there’s more to Shrove Tuesday than pigging out on pancakes or taking part in a public pancake race. The pancakes themselves are part of an ancient custom with deeply religious roots.

Penitence

Shrove Tuesday gets its name from the ritual of shriving that Christians used to undergo in the past. In shriving, a person confesses their sins and receives absolution for them. When a person receives absolution for their sins, they are forgiven for them and released from the guilt and pain that they have caused them. In the Catholic or Orthodox context, the absolution is pronounced by a priest. This tradition is very old. Over 1000 years ago a monk wrote in the Anglo-Saxon …

Ecclesiastical Institutes:
In the week immediately before Lent everyone shall go to his confessor and confess his deeds and the confessor shall so shrive him.

Shrove Tuesday Celebrations

Shrove Tuesday is a day of celebration as well as penitence, because it’s the last day before Lent. Lent is a time of abstinence, of giving things up. So Shrove Tuesday is the last chance to indulge yourself, and to use up the foods that aren’t allowed in Lent. Giving up foods: but not wasting them. In the old days there were many foods that observant Christians would not eat during Lent: foods such as meat and fish, fats, eggs, and milky foods. So that no food was wasted, families would have a feast on the shriving Tuesday, and eat up all the foods that wouldn’t last the forty days of Lent without going off.

The need to eat up the fats gave rise to the French name Mardi Gras; meaning fat Tuesday. Pancakes became associated with Shrove Tuesday as they were a dish that could use up all the eggs, fats and milk in the house with just the addition of flour.

Don’t Play the Blame Game – Rev. Michael’s Musings

“The one who blames others has a long way to go on their journey.
The one who blames themselves is half way there. The one who blames no one has arrived.
—Chinese Proverb

One thing about being young and having siblings is the joy of pointing our finger at them when something goes wrong! “Who made this mess?” my mom would ask my brother and me. Both of us would our quickly point our fingers at the other in the hope of passing off the responsibility. It didn’t work to often; usually mom had a pretty good idea of where it came from and who was responsible.

It is interesting that this tendency to point the finger is often not only meant to avoid accountability but also to distract. And when the finger is pointed in another direction too often, we might get the idea that all our problems are caused by others. One of my favorite quotes goes something like this; “The only common feature of all your dissatisfying relationships is you.” Jesus is indeed right. Even though our fingers may point at others, the reality is we are the authors of all of our dissatisfactions and unrealized expectations. And too often we allow our unhealthiness to keep us looking in all the wrong places for solutions to our troubles, but in pointing the finger we neglect the actual prescription; examine our hearts.

Lent is upon us, the season of examining our hearts. In our worship we will be g at some of the soul struggles that keep us emotionally immature and, and, accordingly clouds our relationship with God and each other. Let’s own what is truly troubling the waters of our spirt: our broken hearts, our self centered souls, and out thoughtless words and deed. Let us ask Christ to illumine our souls and gracefully smooth our personality’s edges. Join us as we work on the heart so that it may not just know Jesus, but that we may love like Jesus as well. Let our fingers point in only one direction, to the source of healing, mercy, and salvation.

See you in worship!
Rev, Michael

Hope for Haiti

Hope Village Global is a medical group that is planning a trip to Haiti in April 2019 in order to serve a village and orphanage there. On their last trip they provided medical care for over 800 people. 

For an upcoming trip, Hope Village Global is seeking donations of new, unopened over-the-counter medication. Sadly, the people that they serve in Haiti do not have resources to obtain basic medications, such as Tylenol or vitamins, for themselves. Parents have been known to feign illness to obtain medicine for their children.

For people willing to assist, the Missions Team has placed a basket in the Narthex to collect donated medicine. There are small handouts attached to the basket identifying what types of medication(s) are needed. We will be collecting donations through the first week in April, at which time the basket (or baskets!) will be delivered to Hope Village Global to support their medical outreach. 

For information or to help with this mission, contact Greg or Toni through the church office.

Legacy Endowment Foundation

2018 was a rewarding year for the Foundation in that for the first time we were able to utilize the fruits of its creation. There were two requests for monies that were granted by the Foundation team. Those funds were used to help purchase bells for the Bell Choir and add equipment for our Media needs. Without the caring, loving support of the people of SHUMC, this would not have been possible. Thank you.

The money provided by these folks is invested through our Conference and we are allowed to use a portion of the interest each year for projects that enhance the purpose of SHUMC. It is a true blessing from those who have been blessed.

Ways you can give:

  1. Use part of your RMD withdrawal. Set it up with your
    Financial advisor to maximize your pre-tax advantage
  2. Tithe your will
  3. Write a check

If you would like more information on how you can contribute to the Legacy Endowment Foundation and help perpetuate our purpose, please contact the church office. Many Blessings to all.